Calendar

Weekly Workflow

Most college courses are designed with the intent that students spend, on average, 2-3 hours for each credit hour per week of the semester. For this 3-hour course, that means you should expect to spend 6-9 hours per week. Since we spend roughly 1.5 hours in face-to-face meetings, that leaves 4.5-7.5 hours that you should plan to schedule throughout the week, every week. Cognitive science recommends working at small bursts throughout the week rather than in one lengthy session. For this reason, ARC 232 has several activity markers through the week (see below); you are encouraged to likewise plan your week so that you are working consistently with the material. No matter the pace you choose, you are advised to work through the readings and online materials in the sequence indicated for each day on the calendar. Do not proceed through days labeled "preliminary."

The workweek for the blended ARC232 begins on Wednesdays, with the following consistent markers:

  • Friday (1 PM): assignment checks
  • Monday (1 PM): assignment checks
  • Tuesday (9:30-10:45): face-to-face class

Note: Having tech problems? For JU service issues, contact the IT Helpdesk; for specific applications, troubleshoot VoiceThread directly; for missing/broken links on this website, email Dr. Amundson).

Semester Perspective

January 09-15: Inventing the Renaissance

Objectives: At the end of this unit, you should be able to:

  • Remember and identify key buildings, patrons, architects (especially Brunelleschi), and building technology (especially at Florence Cathedral) associated with the early Renaissance
  • Use professional terminology accurately and explain how new terms reveal new concerns
  • Interpret the cultural/intellectual factors in early fifteenth-century Florence that affected change in architectural design
  • Classify design principles that distinguish the early Renaissance from the Middle Ages

By Friday (1 PM):

  1. Take: this readiness survey
  2. Complete: this followup assignment (& send to Dr. Amundson)
  3. Access: unit outline
  4. Take: pre-study quiz

By Monday (1 PM):

  1. Subscribe: VoiceThread group ARC232-2019 (browser requirements: for full support, use Google Chrome or Mozilla Firefox). If you do not subscribe to the group, you could have access problems later in the semester. Make sure to upload an image of your face as your icon (required for full credit).
  2. Read: Buildings Across Time, chapter 11 (pp. 285-298)
  3. Take: post-study quiz
  4. Reflect: on your study for the week; record your observations in the template and bring it to class.
  5. For further insights, view: this brief slideshow of a trip to the top of the Duomo

On Tuesday:

  1. Introduction to the course
  2. Brunelleschi; the Medici
  3. Activity: concept map (Medieval and/or Renaissance practices)

January 16-22: Early Renaissance

Objectives: At the end of this unit, you should be able to:

  • Remember and identify key buildings, patrons, architects (especially Alberti and Bramante), and theorists from the Early Renaissance
  • Use professional terminology accurately and explain how new terms reveal new concerns
  • Interpret the cultural factors that affect change in architectural design in the Early Renaissance
  • Classify design principles that distinguish the Early Renaissance in Florence and Rome
  • Understand the main ideas in select Renaissance architectural theories and explain how architects manifest those ideas in architectural design

By Friday (1 PM):

  1. Take: study session survey
  2. Take: pre-study quiz
  3. Access: unit outline
  4. Complete theory assignment

By Monday (1 PM):

  1. Read: Buildings Across Time, chapter 11 (pp. 299-304)
  2. Watch: Renaissance Theory (VoiceThread, 30 min.)
  3. Watch: "Old Sacristy" (SmartHistory, 4 min.)
  4. Watch: "Palazzo Rucellai" (SmartHistory, 5 min.)
  5. Take: post-study quiz (Renaissance theory)
  6. Review this chart to participate in the discussion forum (Alberti) if you are assigned to "follow-up"
  7. Reflect: on your study for the week; record your observations in the template and bring it to class.
  8. For further insights, review this digitized edition of Alberti from 1541; watch Santa Maria Novella (video); read Intro to Michelangelo (article); take Sistine Chapel (quiz); visit San Lorenzo (panoramas); take quizzes on the Palazzo Rucellai and Early Renaissance

On Tuesday:

  1. Bramante; theory; introduction to St. Peter's
  2. Activity: Renaissance theory

January 23-29: High Renaissance

Objectives: At the end of this unit, you should be able to:

  • Remember and identify key buildings (especially "new" St. Peter's), archetypes (like the palazzo and villa), patrons (especially the popes), architects (especially Michelangelo and Palladio) from the High Renaissance
  • Use professional terminology accurately and explain how new terms reveal new concerns
  • Interpret the cultural factors that affected change in architectural design in the High Renaissance
  • Classify design principles that distinguish the High from the Early Renaissance

By Friday (1 PM):

  1. Take: pre-study quiz
  2. Access: unit outline
  3. Review this chart to participate in the discussion forum (Alberti) if you are assigned to "summary"

By Monday (1 PM):

  1. Read: Buildings Across Time, chapter 11 (304-326)
  2. Watch: "St. Peter's Basilica" (at least the first half) (VoiceThread, 25-30 min.)note: this collection of plans may be helpful to print & keep at hand
  3. Study: "The School of Athens" in its context (virtual tour)
  4. Watch: "New Sacristy (SmartHistory, 7 min.)
  5. Watch: "Laurentian Library" (SmartHistory, 8 min.)
  6. Take: post-study quiz 
  7. Reflect: on your study for the week; record your observations in the template and bring it to class.
  8. For further insights, watch: The ceiling of the Sistine Chapel (7 min.); review a digitized copy of I quattro libri dell'architettura; see this brief excerpt; here is another digitized Palladio; visit: St. Peter's (interior) & piazza (panoramas); review a website dedicated to Palladio (Palladio Centre, Vicenza)

On Tuesday

  1. Quiz 1: Early & High Renaissance (i.e., including the material we will cover in class today)
    • building identification: name, architect, date, location, client/patron
    • terminology
    • one question based on "objectives"
  2. Michelangelo & Palladio

January 30-February 5: Baroque Italy [PRELIMINARY]

Objectives: At the end of this unit, you should be able to:

  • Remember and identify key buildings, patrons, architects (especially Bernini & Borromini), and theories from the Baroque period
  • Use professional terminology accurately and explain how new terms reveal new concerns
  • Interpret the cultural factors (and specific historic events in the Church) in Italy that affected change in architectural design
  • Classify design principles that distinguish the Italian Baroque from the Renaissance

By Friday (1 PM):

  1. Take: pre-study quiz
  2. Access: unit outline
  3. Access: this form (fill out its first column during your study this week)

By Monday: (1 PM):

  1. Read: Buildings Across Time, chapter 12 (339-356)
  2. Watch:  "Bernini's David" (SmartHistory, 5 min.)
  3. Watch: "St. Peter's Basilica" (at least the second half) (VoiceThread, 25-30 min.)
  4. Watch: "Piazza di San Pietro" (SmartHistory, 5 min.)
  5. Watch: "San Andrea al Quirinale" (SmartHistory, 8 min.)
  6. Visit: San Carlo alle Quattro Fontane (panoramas) and San Andrea al Quirinale (panoramas)
  7. Take: post-study quiz
  8. Contribute: discussion forum (Renaissance & Baroque churches)
  9. Reflect: on your study for the week; record your observations in the template and bring it to class.
  10. For further insights, watch: Baldacchino (5 min.) and Cathedra Petri (3 min.)

On Tuesday:

  1. The Reformation & Counter-Reformation; Baroque in Italy (Bernini & Borromini)
  2. Activity: Renaissance and Baroque Davids

February 6-12: Baroque France & England [PRELIMINARY]

Objectives: At the end of this unit, you should be able to:

  • Remember and identify key buildings (especially Versailles, St. Paul's, and archetypes like the château), patrons, and architects (Wren, Le Vau {& his colleagues}), building technology (especially at St. Paul's),from the Baroque period in France and England
  • Use professional terminology accurately and explain how new terms reveal new concerns
  • Interpret the cultural factors (both political & religious) in seventeenth-century France and England that affected change in architectural design
  • Classify design principles that distinguish French and English Baroque from the Italian idiom

By Friday (1 PM):

  1. Take: pre-study quiz
  2. Access: unit outline
  3. Retrieve: this form (fill out its second and third columns during your study this week)

By Monday (1 PM):

  1. Read: Buildings Across Time, chapter 11 (326-337) & chapter 12 (356-377)
  2. Watch: "Building Additions at Versailles" (YouTube, 4 min.)
  3. Watch: "Versailles: Palace & Garden" (VoiceThread, 33 min.)
  4. Watch: "London City Churches" (YouTube, 5 min.)
  5. Watch: "St. Paul’s Cathedral" (SmartHistory, 9 min.)
  6. Visit: Vaux-le-Vicomte (panoramas); 360º tours of select parts of Versailles: the Hall of Mirrors, Salon of War, and Salon of Peace;  360º tours of church interiors by Wren
  7. Take: post-study quiz 
  8. Reflect: on your study for the week; record your observations in the template and bring it to class.
  9. For further insights, review the Wren drawings in the collection of the Cathedral

On Tuesday

  1. Baroque in France & England
  2. Activity: work with the three-columned chart completed this week & last ( have it with you)

February 13-19: Muslim Empires [PRELIMINARY]

Objectives: At the end of this unit, you should be able to:

  • Remember and identify key buildings, archetypes (especially mosque typologies), patrons (especially Süleyman, Shah Jahan, and Shah Abbas), and architects (especially Sinan) from the Ottoman, Safavid, and Mughal empires
  • Use professional terminology accurately and explain how new terms reveal new concerns
  • Interpret the cultural factors that affected change in architectural design in the three empires
  • Classify design principles that distinguish the design traditions of each empire (especially in the design of urban centers, gardens, and mosques)

By Friday (1 PM):

  1. Take: pre-study quiz
  2. Access: unit outline
  3. Access: worksheet for Islamic architecture, by group:

By Monday (1 PM):

  1. Read: Buildings Across Time, chapter 7 (153-175)
  2. Read: "Comparison of the Three Empires" (article)
  3. Watch: "Geometry in Islamic Design" (5 min.)
  4. Read: "Overview of Isfahan" (website)
  5. Watch: "Mihrab from Isfahan" (6 min.)
  6. Read: "The Great Mosque (Masjede Jameh/Friday/Great Mosque) of Isfahan" (article)
  7. Visit: Isfahan via 360º views of these sites:
    1. Naghsh-e Jahan Square - by Day (Shah Square or Imam Square)
    2. Masjed-e Emam - Sanctuary (Shah Mosque)
    3. Masjede Jameh Esfahan - Courtyard (Friday/Great Mosque)
    4. Masjede Jameh Esfahan - Sanctuary (Friday/Great Mosque)
    5. Coppersmith Artisans in Esfahan (the bazaar)
  8. Watch: "Hagia Sophia as a Mosque" (7 min.)
  9. Watch: "Süleymaniye Mosque, Istanbul" (7 min.)
  10. Visit: Suleymaniye (panoramas)
  11. Visit: Rustem Pasha (panoramas)
  12. Take: post-study quiz
  13. Conclude group worksheet; consider how you will translate the findings of your group into an individual graphic exercise due next week
  14. Reflect: on your study for the week; record your observations in the template and bring it to class.
  15. For further insights, read this article on "The Silent Theology of Islamic Art"and watch this video about the Rüstem Pasha Mosque, Istanbul (9 min.); watch "Cleaning the Taj Mahal": general & technical

On Tuesday

  1. quiz 2: High Renaissance & Baroque
  2. Muslim empires

February 20-26: New Classicisms [PRELIMINARY]

Objectives: At the end of this unit, you should be able to:

  • Remember and identify key buildings, patrons, architects, building technology, and theories (and the books they were published in) associated with the "New Classicisms" of the eighteenth century +/-
  • Use professional terminology accurately and explain how new terms reveal new concerns
  • Interpret the cultural factors (social, political, technical and artistic) in eighteenth-century Great Britain, France, and the USA that affected change in architectural design (with special emphasis on the development of archaeology)
  • Classify design principles that distinguish versions of Classicism (Baroque, Anglo/Neo-Palladian, various versions of Adam-era "Neo-Classicism," Grecian and Italianate)

By Friday (1 PM):

  1. Submit: a one-page PDF that graphically summarizes the most important characteristics of architecture in the Islamic empires from last week. Use any concept map, graph, etc., form you like; just make sure it is clear, includes graphics and a minimum of text. Send to Dr. Amundson via email.
  2. Take: pre-study quiz
  3. Access: unit outline

By Monday (1 PM):

  1. Read Buildings Across Time, chapter 13 (379-395)
  2. Read: "Classicism and Language in Architecture" (Westfall)
  3. Review: these resources (spend at least 30 minutes looking at these books)
  4. Take: post-study quiz
  5. Take: this gorgeous survey
  6. Reflect: on your study for the week; record your observations in the template and bring it to class.
  7. For additional insights, view: panorama of Great Hall, Blenheim Palace and Palladio and Britain (RIBA exhibition)Piranesi, Le Carceri d'Invenzione (1745-50)

On Tuesday

  1. Overview of Muslim empires project
  2. Classicism(s)
  3. Activity: Classical dissections
  4. note for next week: class does not meet on March 5 (Spring Break)

February 27-March 12: Late 18th/Early 19th C. Theory, Style, and Industry [PRELIMINARY]

Objectives: At the end of this unit, you should be able to:

  • Remember and identify key buildings (& archetypal gardens), patrons, architects, building technology (especially the products of the Industrial Revolution), and theories (especially the Sublime, Picturesque, and Associationism) in Great Britain, ca. 1750-1850
  • Use professional terminology accurately and explain how new terms reveal new concerns
  • Interpret the cultural factors (especially the Industrial Revolution) that affect changes in architectural design in Great Britain, ca. 1750-1850
  • Classify design principles that distinguish associated with the flourishing of styles in the period
  • Understand the main ideas in the Beautiful, the Sublime, and the Picturesque, and explain how those ideas are manifest in architectural design

By Friday (1 PM/March 1):

  1. Take: pre-study quiz
  2. Access: unit outline
  3. Take: survey on blended learning; earlier version: first impressions 

By Monday (1 PM/March 11):

  1. Read: Buildings Across Time, chapter 13 (395-399) & chapter 14 (401-412)
  2. Watch: "Iron and Industry" (YouTube, 7 min.)
  3. Study: "The History of the Iron Bridge, Coalbrookdale" (website)
  4. Study: "The Iron Bridge: How was it Bulit?" (website)
  5. Watch: "The Houses of Parliament, London (SmartHistory, 7 min.)
  6. Be inspired: tribute to England;s great engineer, Isambard Kingdom Brunel (YouTube, 2 min.)
  7. Complete theory assignment
  8. Send: two JPEGs to Dr. Amundson, showing buildings constructed in the 20th c. (or after) that illustrate the principles of the Sublime and Picturesque (label them accordingly).
  9. Take: post-study quiz 
  10. Watch: the Crystal Palace burn to the ground
  11. Reflect: on your study for the week; record your observations in the template and bring it to class.
  12. For further insights, read Archibald Alison, Essays on the Nature and Principles of Taste (London: 1790); take: quiz on the Houses of Parliament

On Tuesday

  1. Late 18th & early 19th-century industry, style, & theory
  2. Activity: Discussion of your work on Burke & Price

March 13-19: Arts and Crafts Movement, the École des Beaux-Arts [PRELIMINARY]

Objectives: At the end of this unit, you should be able to:

  • Remember and identify key buildings, patrons, architects, building technology, and theories from the later 19th c. in England and France (including professional education in the latter)
  • Use professional terminology accurately and explain how new terms reveal new concerns
  • Interpret the cultural factors in later 19th c.-France and England that affected change in architectural design; explain the impact of developing professionalism and professional education on the role of women in architecture
  • Classify design principles that distinguish the Arts and Crafts Movement and the École des Beaux-Arts method from each other and other idioms
  • Understand the main ideas in select architectural theories (especially the Arts and Crafts and the French Academic approach) and explain how those ideas are manifest in architectural design

By Friday (1 PM):

  1. Take: pre-study quiz
  2. Access: unit outline

By Monday (1 PM):

  1. Read Buildings Across Time, chapter 14 (412-429)
  2. Complete theory assignment
  3. Read: "Haussmann's plan for Paris" (article)
  4. Watch: "La Opera" (SmartHistory, 5 min.)
  5. Watch: "Arts and Crafts" (Design In A Nutshell, 2 min.)
  6. Watch: "Blockprinting a William Morris Wallpaper Design" (YouTube, 3 min.)
  7. Watch: "All Saints, Margaret Street, London" (SmartHistory, 8 min.)
  8. Take: post-study quiz
  9. Reflect: on your study for the week; record your observations in the template and bring it to class.
  10. For additional insights, read John Ruskin: The Seven Lamps of Architecture (1851) (link to a digitized edition) and  Eugène-Emmanuel Viollet-le-Duc: Lectures on Architecture (1872); link to a digitized edition of the Discourses; websites on William Morris and Phillip Webb; read Ruskin, The Stones of Venice (digitized)

Tuesday:

  1. Quiz 3: Islam, Neo-Classicisms, 18th/19th C.
  2. British Arts & Crafts movement; the École des Beaux-Arts
  3. Theory discussion

March 20-26: Tall Buildings and the Belle Époque [PRELIMINARY]

Objectives: At the end of this unit, you should be able to:

  • Remember and identify key buildings, patrons, architects, building technology, and theories from the late 19th c. and turn of the century
  • Use professional terminology accurately and explain how new terms reveal new concerns
  • Interpret the cultural factors in major US and European cities that affected change in architectural design
  • Classify design principles that distinguish the range of approaches to tall building design in the US and the variety of art nouveau idioms across Europe

By Friday (1 PM):

  1. Take: pre-study quiz
  2. Access: unit outline (& #2)

By Monday (1 PM):

  1. Read Buildings Across Time, chapter 14 (422-425 and 429-449)
  2. Watch: "Paris Metros" (SmartHistory, 4 min.)
  3. Watch: "Sagrada Familia" (SmartHistory, 6 min.)
  4. Take: post-study quiz 
  5. Complete this assignment
  6. Reflect: on your study for the week; record your observations in the template and bring it to class.
  7. For additional insights, review: recreating Sullivan's 19th-century ornament with 21st-century toolsParis Exposition of 1889 (website); and Paris Exposition of 1889 (another website)

On Tuesday

  1.  Tall Buildings, Belle Epoque
  2. Activity: Art Nouveau

March 27-April 02: Early Modernism: The Machine Age [PRELIMINARY]

Objectives: At the end of this unit, you should be able to:

  • Remember and identify key buildings, architects, building technology (especially ferro-concrete), and theories from the early 20th c.'s "Machine Age"
  • Use professional terminology accurately and explain how new terms reveal new concerns
  • Interpret the cultural factors that affected change in architectural design in Europe in the first decades of the 20th c.
  • Classify design principles that distinguish the many idioms of "Machine Age" architecture

By Friday (1 PM):

  1. Take: pre-study quiz
  2. Access: unit outline

By Monday (1 PM):

  1. Read Buildings Across Time, chapter 15 (451-463 & 477-483)
  2. Watch: "Steel and Concrete" (YouTube, 5 min.) (you can tune out after the presenter gets to the couplers)
  3. Watch: "Notre-Dame de Raincy" (YouTube, 26 min.)
  4. Watch: "AEG" (Companies HIstory, 6 min.)
  5. Watch: "Robie House" (9 min.)
  6. Take: post-study quiz
  7. Reflect: on your study for the week; record your observations in the template and bring it to class.
  8. For additional insights, review: "raumplan" through an analysis of the Haus Müller (4 min.); timeline of the history of reinforced concretehistory of the AEG (the company itself & Behren's place in it; 10 min.);  AEG & Fagus factories (26 min.)

On Tuesday

  1. Early Modernism; the Machine Age
  2. Activity: What is "modern"?

April 3-9: Early European Modernism: The “Neues Bauen” [PRELIMINARY]

Objectives: At the end of this unit, you should be able to:

  • Remember and identify key buildings, architects, building technology, and theories from the 1920s & '30s in Europe
  • Use professional terminology accurately and explain how new terms reveal new concerns
  • Interpret the cultural factors that affected change in architectural design in Europe in the 1920s & '30s; explain the impact of Modernist theory on the role of women in the profession
  • Classify design principles that distinguish the neues bauen and de Stijl
  • Understand the main ideas in select architectural theories and explain how those ideas are manifest in architectural design

By Friday (1 PM):

  1. Take: pre-study quiz
  2. Access: unit outline
  3. Complete theory assignment

By Monday (1 PM):

  1. Read: Buildings Across Time, chapter 15 (483-505)
  2. Watch: Schroeder House (4 min.) and this stop motion (2 min.) and oh while you're at it, this (1 min.) is kind of fun, too
  3. Watch: Bauhaus projects (1 min.)
  4. Watch: Bauhaus: part 1  (15 min.) and part 2 (13 min.)
  5. Watch: Villa Savoye and the Five Points of Architecture (3 min.)
  6. Visit: Villa Savoye
  7. Visit: The German Pavilion (5 min.)
  8. Take: post-study quiz
  9. Review this chart to participate in the discussion forum (Le Corbusier) if you are assigned to "follow-up"
  10. Reflect: on your study for the week; record your observations in the template and bring it to class.
  11. For further insights, review: Le Corbusier: Vers une Architecture (excerpt, 1923)Le Corbusier (digitized)the Fondation LeCorbuiser, Archives websitearticle on the Villa SavoyeNeues Bauen webpageLe Corbusier, Towards a New Architecture (digitized)think about materiality in relation to the design of the German Pavilion; and The Women of the Bauhaus

On Tuesday

  1. Quiz 4: from Arts & Crafts to Machine Age
  2. Early European Modernism (Neues Bauen)

April 10-16: Mid-Century Modernism [PRELIMINARY]

Objectives: At the end of this unit, you should be able to:

  • Remember and identify key buildings, architects, building technology, and theories from the mid-20th c.
  • Use professional terminology accurately and explain how new terms reveal new concerns
  • Interpret the cultural factors that affected change in architectural design in mid-20th-c. Europe and USA
  • Classify design principles that distinguish the mid-century Modernism of different architects (especially Le Corbusier, Mies van der Rohe, and Frank Lloyd Wright)

By Friday (1 PM):

  1. Take: pre-study quiz
  2. Access: unit outline
  3. Review this chart to participate in the discussion forum (Le Corbusier) if you are assigned to "summary"

By Monday (1 PM):

  1. Read Buildings Across Time, chapter 15 (493-505)
  2. Watch: "Guggenheim Museum" (SmartHistory, 7 min.)
  3. Watch: "Seagram Building" (SmartHistory, 9 min.)
  4. Watch: short film featuring the voices of Mies van der Rohe & Walter Gropius (YouTube, 5 min.)
  5. Watch: interview with Le Corbusier (YouTube, 5 min.)
  6. Watch: interview with Frank Lloyd Wright (YouTube, 3 min.)
  7. Take: post-study quiz
  8. Reflect: on your study for the week; record your observations in the template and bring it to class.
  9. For further insights, take this quiz on the Seagram Buildingtake this quiz on the International Stylevisit the Fondation LeCorbuiser, Archives websitewatch the whole Mike Wallace interview with Wrightwatch this video on the Lever House (5 min.)

Tuesday

  1. Mid-Twentieth Century Modernism
  2. Activity: concept maps on mid-century modernism

April 17-23: Late Twentieth Century [PRELIMINARY]

Objectives: At the end of this unit, you should be able to:

  • Remember and identify key buildings, patrons, architects, building materials, and theories from the late 20th c.
  • Use professional terminology accurately and explain how new terms reveal new concerns
  • Interpret the cultural factors that affected change in architectural design in the late 20th c.
  • Classify design principles that distinguish High Tech, Post-Modernism, Deconstructivism, and Neo-Traditionalism from each other, and from their predecessors (variations of Modernism and Neo-Classicism)
  • Understand the main ideas in select architectural theories (especially Post-Modernism and Deconstructivism) and explain how those ideas are manifest in architectural design

By Friday (1 PM):

  1. Take: pre-study quiz
  2. Review: unit outline 
  3. Complete theory assignment

By Monday (1 PM):

  1. Read Buildings Across Time, chapter 16 (517-35)
  2. Read: "High-Tech" (article)
  3. Watch: "Pompidou Center" (YouTube, 1 min.)
  4. Visit: "Pompidou Center Galleries" (YouTube, 3 min.)
  5. Watch: "Vanna Venturi House" (YouTube, 6 min.)
  6. Watch: "Trailer for Decon" (YouTube, 2 min.)
  7. Watch: "Prince Charles' Speech to the RIBA" (YouTube, 1 min.), given in reference to an addition planned for the National Gallery
  8. Visit: Zaha Hadid exhibition at the Serpentine (London)
  9. Take: post-study quiz
  10. Review this chart to participate in the discussion forum (Venturi) if you are assigned to "follow-up"
  11. Reflect: on your study for the week; record your observations in the template and bring it to class.
  12. For further insights, review: Post-Modernism (webpage)Robert Venturi: Complexity and Contradiction in Architecture (1966); click for digitized editionDeconstructivism (webpage)Philip Johnson and Mark Wigley: Deconstructivist Architecture (excerpt, 1988); click for digitized editionPrince Charles' RIBA speech (1984; webpage)Demetri Porphyrios, “Classicism is Not a Style” (excerpt, 1993)

On Tuesday

  1.  Late 20th c.
  2. Activity:
  3. Note: Easter Break (Friday, April 19-Monday, April 22)

April 24-May 02: Conclusions [PRELIMINARY]

By Monday (1 PM):

  1. Review this chart to participate in the discussion forum (Venturi) if you are assigned to "summary"
  2. turn in project from first week: what to do with traditions
  3. Take: this survey

Thursday, May 2 (8:00 AM):

  1. quiz 5: Neues Bauen through the end of the 20th c.
  2. Activity: TBD
  3. cumulative unessay
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