part eight: space and experience

I think you know this place

introduction

context matters

Too frequently, we think of buildings as stand-alone objects, somehow divorced from the ground they rest on, the environment that surrounds them, and the very weather and light that affects our impressions of them. All of these elements affect the way we experience architecture from the outside and inside. Good architects consider the emotional and psychological affects of their buildings on people inside of them, but also think about the way buildings contribute to (and hopefully don't detract from) their surroundings.

From a Christian perspective ...

learning objectives

At the conclusion of this part of the course, you should be able to:

  • xxxxx (REMEMBER--recall facts and basic concepts) define, duplicate, list, memorize, repeat, state
  • xxxxx (UNDERSTAND--explain ideas and concepts) classify, describe, discuss, explain, identify, locate, recognize, report, select
  • xxxxx (APPLY--use information in new situations) execute, implement, solve, use, demonstrate, interpret, operate, schedule, sketch
  • xxxxx (ANALYZE--draw connections among ideas) differentiate, organize, relate, compare, contrast, distinguish, examine, experiment, question, test
  • xxxxx (EVALUATE--justify a stand) appraise, argue, defend, judge, select, support, critique, weigh
  • xxxxxx (CREATE--produce new or original work) design, assemble, conjecture, develop, formulate, investigate

for Thursday (11 PM)

spatial experiences (investigating)

It's hard to avoid forming impressions of space--from vast parks and urban plazas to cramped bus shelters and soaring atriums--although we're not always aware that these impressions are forming. Your first impressions of Belmont may have had something to do with the feeling you had when you first stepped on the campus. The same might be said for your most memorable travels to a weekly event of ordinary life.

After reading the Goldberg section for this week, write in your journal about memorable spaces from your own experiences. Then, complete draft two assignments:

  1. Walk the campus--the whole campus--with or without someone else from class. Write and sketch as you go. Formalize your impressions of the campus in a two-page paper in which you explain the part(s) of campus that you find most impressive (and remember, that word can be positive or negative). Perhaps you will only write about good things. Perhaps you are stuck by how part of the campus is really appealing to you and another part is not. At this point, just write a rough draft; ideally, share it with some one in the class for feedback.
  2. Write a quick description (just one page) describing the most impressive architectural space (inside or out) that you've ever experienced.

for Monday (11 AM)

spatial experiences (formalized)

Having let your first thoughts sit for a few days, and ideally after talking about the Belmont campus with at least one other person in class, by 11 AM send more formal writings to me as PDFs. Make sure your name, the date, course name, and assignment title are in the header of each.

Application

  1. Two-page illustrated (your sketches are preferred; photographs are OK) paper on the Belmont campus. File name:10105WK8-01-YOURLASTNAME
  2. One-page unillustrated paper on your most impressive architectural space.File name:10105WK8-02-YOURLASTNAME

for Tuesday: on campus

red yellow blue

Quiz

  • history of architectural education
    • apprenticeship tradition
    • Royal Academy (London)
    • Franklin Institute (Philadelphia)
    • Ecole des Beaux-Arts (Paris)
    • Bauhaus (Dessau)
    • American universities

Discussions

  • Goldberger
  • your work on spaces
  • In groups: analyze plans, predict experiences (129); analyze. Church 134.

Presentation & Reflection

  • Establish three working groups for sustainability studies (ecological/environmental, cultural, social equity/economic)

for Tuesday: online

red yellow blue

Quiz

  • history of architectural education
    • apprenticeship tradition
    • Royal Academy (London)
    • Franklin Institute (Philadelphia)
    • Ecole des Beaux-Arts (Paris)
    • Bauhaus (Dessau)
    • American universities

Discussions

  • Goldberger
  • your work on spaces
  • In groups: analyze plans, predict experiences (129); analyze. Church 134.

Presentation & Reflection

  • Introduction to Sustainability (ecological/environmental, cultural, social equity, economic)
    • establish three working groups
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