ARC 232 discussion board: TOPIC 01

TOPIC 01: Reflections on ARC231 (Due Tues., Jan. 16 at 11:59 PM CST)

Skim through the textbook up to ch. 11 to remind yourself what we covered in ARC 231. Which of the period/era/movements was most interesting to you? Name it and explain (in no more than 100 words) why you found it memorable.

Response: comment on at least one colleague’s post.

77 Comments

  1. Reply
    Gabe David January 10, 2018

    The topic that I found most interesting was the breakdown of the cultures of the Romans and the Greeks. It was interesting to discover the origins of two of the most famous societies in the ancient world. Learning about how the Romans were once known as the Etruscans, and the legends surrounding the two brothers that founded Rome, Romulus and Remus, I found to be interesting. As well the passing down of what makes entertainment for this society. I was also intrigued by how the Greeks were different from the Romans in manners of entertainment, and seeing that these differences would often impact the buildings that were constructed and the purposes of these structures.

    • Reply
      Abacuc Rodriguez January 18, 2018

      I agree that learning about the Roman and Greek culture was very interesting. I also thought that was the most interesting topic, especially because we might visit some of those buildings during the Europe trip. Finding out that the Romans took influence from the Etruscans and the Greek took from the Minoans and Mycenaeans was not what I expected. Also seeing how similar Roman and Greek architecture are was very surprising.

    • Reply
      JhenniferAmundson January 18, 2018

      Do you think by the end of the semester you’ll know why the Greeks and Romans are “the most famous societies in the ancient world”? How did that happen?

    • Reply
      Riselle Iris Leong March 6, 2018

      I can most definitely agree with you that Roman and Greek architecture is very intriguing. I, myself, have always been so invested in their culture and ruins. I find it most interesting how their political state affected the architecture and need functions for certain buildings and how they are similar yet highly contrast each other. It’s amazing how their ideas show so clearly in the way and location they build their buildings in comparison to each other. I wonder if the the focus of the family changed by looking at the standard plans of a domus to an oikos.

  2. Reply
    Maxwell Starcevich January 10, 2018

    The pre-historic period of architecture was most interesting to me. On the surface, part of the appeal is the sheer mystery that shrouds pre-historic architecture. I think there is more to it though. Much of architecture history (from cultures/eras on which a large body of knowledge exists) is less concerned with what happened, and is more concerned with who was right, or why something happened. These questions are important, but I think that early human cultures have a lot to teach us. Unless we actively seek understanding of our beginnings, more recent architecture may be misinterpreted.

    • Reply
      Desmond Wahlfeld January 16, 2018

      I agree that it was quite interesting to find out about the beginnings of architecture as well as see the vast disbursement of these structures built with a sense of permanence about them rather than the basic survival as it would be easy to believe.

    • Reply
      Adam Wise January 16, 2018

      Woot! I liked the pre-historic period the best also! I do agree that there is a certain air of mystery about such ancient structures, and it can be fun to speculate about their exact function. I have one question, though. What exactly do you mean by “more recent architecture” being “misinterpreted?”

      • Reply
        Maxwell Starcevich January 20, 2018

        Recent architecture might be interpreted through the lens of errant beliefs about pre-historic architecture. For instance, the belief that ancient cultures were less capable than ours has permeated our culture. This in turn leads to the expectation that architecture will only get better, when in fact, it may sometimes be the opposite.

    • Reply
      Elizabeth Van Bruggen January 16, 2018

      I find it interesting how you connected with the pre-historic period because it has such mystery. When I look back on this time period I too am mystified by the things that they accomplished and the new understandings they gained. I find it interesting how even today we are still learning new things, but when you look cross-culturally there is a level of variance between what people have learned and their ability to complete or continue to improve there standard of living. For some cultures it almost seems like they are stuck in a different age and it’s like taking a trip in a time machine when you encounter their living situations. I think it is important in these situations and others like it to gather our knowledge from the past to help the people of today to continue to grow and improve their standard of living.

    • Reply
      JhenniferAmundson January 18, 2018

      I’m intrigued by this line of interest in “mystery.” If that’s a value in old things, is it a value that’s worth imbuing in new things?

  3. Reply
    Alex Karidas January 12, 2018

    I found learning about the Greek culture was fascinating as I belong to that heritage. It was interesting to see their evolution as a culture and where it started. They were heavily influenced my Minoans and Myceneans. Those two cultures greatly influenced Greek architecture and overall design. For a long time, the Greeks were a culture of vast intellect and superb craftmanship in everything they did. Sometime in the future even the Romans picked up some of the traits from the Greeks. Even today we still see Greek culture and design influencing our artistic and design values.

    • Reply
      Taylor Wills January 17, 2018

      The Greek culture was definitely not what I expected it to be, I think I had blended it with the grid-like and axial nature of the Romans. I love how Greek architecture moved with the land, where the cavea of the theatre fits into the hills and the stairs weave through them. It surprised me that this Greek nature could be in the same culture as the rules and distinct proportions of the Greek orders.

    • Reply
      JhenniferAmundson January 18, 2018

      Eager to hear your response to the adoption of Greek precedents by Neo-Classicists around 1750 and the “Revivalists” a bit later. Similar appreciation and source material, very different ends.

  4. Reply
    Desmond Wahlfeld January 12, 2018

    Something that intrigued me the most was learning about the time period between the Roman Empire and the early Medieval period because personally, this was this was the connecting point between two periods I know quite a bit about. This made it easier to connect the Roman period to the Medieval period which I hadn’t previously thought too much about. Additionally seeing this connection helped to see the cultural connections as well as the architectural connections between both these time period with one another as well as the way that Roman culture has so deeply impacted the world we live in now.

    • Reply
      JhenniferAmundson January 18, 2018

      How do you come upon this knowledge? It’s typically a sort of over-looked time since culture and politics sort of fall apart. Which buildings from this period were of special interest to you?

    • Reply
      Riselle Iris Leong March 6, 2018

      That transition from the Roman Empire to the Medieval period did not really stand out to be overall until this comment brought me back to put more thought into it. I wonder how were they able to really learn from the ruins of the Roman Empire and what did they keep from their own architecture during the Medieval period.

  5. Reply
    Emma Okesson January 13, 2018

    The Gothic period of architecture was most interesting to me because it seemed to be one of the first times that theory took the center stage. There were other times when theory was important, like in the development of the pyramids, but Abbot Suger’s developments of Gothic architecture took theory to a whole new level. Suger didn’t need to make all those theoretical advancements–they already had pilgrimage churches that performed functionally–but the theory of worship was important enough to him to make the leap to Gothic architecture and to convince builders and designers to do the same.

    • Reply
      Monica Medina January 16, 2018

      I chose the Gothic period as well! I love that you said it was the first time that it took center stage, because it’s true. Like you said, they already had all the theoretical advancements and basic structures set in place, now it was more defining that gothic design and having that elegant and massive design spread to different designers and “architects”.

    • Reply
      JhenniferAmundson January 18, 2018

      Is it the presence of formal theory, or the content of Suger’s theory, that you’re most interested in? I’ll be interested to learn what you think of the many theorists about to come at you in the Renaissance and beyond.

  6. Reply
    Riselle Iris Leong January 13, 2018

    What stood out most for me was our overview into Chinese and Japanese architecture. The movement and theories behind their cultures really interested me and gave me a better insight on my culture. During their prehistoric period, their homes, oddly enough, look so similar to many native homes in Southeast Asia and Micronesian islands. It was really interesting to see how architecture migrated with the later generations into these newer cultures and groups. It was also interesting to see the similar aesthetics and theories Greek and Roman architecture explored in Japanese and Chinese architecture. These two groups separate from each other by geography and time still built around the same theories, questions, and needs with different solutions, just as how each of us as architects will create different yet similar solutions for the same problem.

    • Reply
      JhenniferAmundson January 18, 2018

      It’s always interesting to see things happening that appear to be alike, and then dig in to see if they really have social/cultural connections, or if their similarities emerge from some more fundamental aspect of humanity.

    • Reply
      Gabe David January 18, 2018

      I myself was intrigued by the layout of Japanese and Chinese homes, specifically in the way that they were structured to be private, in that a person could not simply look through the front door and see everything there is to see. This creates a sense of mystery and curiosity to explore.

  7. Reply
    Elizabeth Van Bruggen January 13, 2018

    I found the Classical Period to be the most interesting to study because it was the period that I had heard the most about and known so little about. I found it interesting how they started to use mathematics so readily in their design techniques and how some of the most extraordinary buildings served the purpose of being worship to gods not homes or work for individuals. The Acropolis stands out overall because of its unique design and purpose as well as the saddening disrepair of what currently stands there.

    • Reply
      JhenniferAmundson January 18, 2018

      Well they are doing their level best to fix it, which would be definitely helped along if the Brits would return the Parthenon sculptures to their original place–but I don’t see that happening any time soon!

  8. Reply
    David Filipowski January 13, 2018

    The ancient Egyptian civilization was the most memorable part of Arc231 for me. The building techniques (possibly unknown / extraterrestrial assistance?) and the purpose behind construction always had my attention. The Egyptians seem to be highly influenced by the divine and, as far as I know, their only motive to built structures was for afterlife purposes. Learning about the Egyptians motivated me to seek more purpose behind the tasks and projects that I attempt. The rich ancient Egyptian culture carried secrets that we are still discovering to this day.

    • Reply
      Andrew Rogers January 16, 2018

      Very similarly to your post, I am also intrigued by the unknown building techniques. Just thinking about things such as the pyramids as well as Stonehenge, it is incredible to think how they were built without modern machines. As you mentioned “extraterrestrial assistance” could be an answer to the construction of the pyramids, but I still am curious to how things like Stonehenge were constructed with nothing but man and potentially animal power.

    • Reply
      Maxwell Starcevich January 16, 2018

      Ancient Egyptian civilization is certainly one of the most fascinating and enduring cultures in history! I think it is wonderful that you say the Egyptians led you to look for deeper meaning in your own work. Egyptians had such a focus on life after death that much of their culture was shaped according to that belief. I wonder if the Egyptians were conscious of this focus, or if they were like many of us today: Not quite sure why we do the things we do. I lean towards the former, as the Egyptians seemed unabashed of their afterlife focus.
      You mention that the only motive of Egyptians building structures was for afterlife purposes. I think that the reason that seems to be the case is because most, if not all, examples of Egyptian architecture are in fact religious. I think the reason for this is not because they were the only buildings, it is simply because all the houses, small public buildings, and other non-permanent structures were not built to last. The absence of houses is not evidence of their absence, rather it tells us how much they thought about the afterlife.
      The suggestion that Egyptians may have had extraterrestrial assistance seems to be predicated on a belief that the Egyptians could not have build their structures without outside help, or that they were less intelligent than we are today. I think that if anything, the opposite is true. Ancient civilizations typically demonstrate a wealth of creativity, knowledge, and the urge to ask questions. According to William of Ockham’s law of parsimony, the postulation that requires the least amount of assumptions is the most likely to be correct. Extraterrestrial assistance requires not only that we assume Egyptians to be incapable of building pyramids themselves, but it also requires the assumption that extraterrestrials exist.
      I too am interested to see continuing archaeological and anthropological developments will be made in Egypt. Just last month two tombs were found in Luxor, Egypt, with a mummy over 3,500 years old!

    • Reply
      JhenniferAmundson January 18, 2018

      They have left some evidence of cities behind, but nothing at the scale, and permanence, of the pyramids!

  9. Reply
    Taylor Wills January 14, 2018

    I found the section on Japanese architecture the most interesting, especially in the 1600s, in the time of the Katsura Imperial Villa. I had not had much exposure to Asian culture in general and I found the thought process and theory behind even the minka of Japan to be thought-provoking. Particularly, in the Katsura Imperial Villa, the way rooms were organized and how windows framed the landscape, which was manicured as well. Having a reflective walk to the shokin-tei with its crouching, humbling entrance was different from any other culture we studied, in its peaceful, reflective nature.

    • Reply
      JT (Jeffrey) Perek January 16, 2018

      I agree with your comments about Japanese architecture, and in particular the Katsura Imperial Villa. It was very compelling to see the intentionality of that particular site. I also found it interesting to see connection between the buildings that were present and the site itself . We often commend modern buildings for attempting this, so I find it fascinating to see a much earlier cite being successful at it, and seeing the inspiration that modern architects have drawn from.

    • Reply
      Aaron Foster January 16, 2018

      I appreciate the way in which this style of design was of great importance and intention. The placement of each part of the composition was thoughtfully placed and used parts of nature to form composition. It was interesting in how pathways and flow was created in a way to humble to the nature and architecture, such as the doorways one had to crawl through to enter.

    • Reply
      JhenniferAmundson January 18, 2018

      I think the Katsura villa & garden are also really interesting when you see what Europeans are doing with fancy houses and gardens at right about the same time–as we will do in a few weeks. Katsura is really remarkable in its simplicity, and that is not easy to do.

  10. Reply
    Anna Wightman January 15, 2018

    Pre-historic architecture was the most interesting to me because of how surprisingly advanced it was. In the past, I thought that early architecture was extremely simplistic, and lacked planning. But through History of Architecture I I’ve learned that even the earliest buildings were successful and well thought out, lasting many for centuries after their builders. I also enjoyed learning that from the beginning, architecture has, most prominently, been used for the purpose of honoring a god or higher being. While technology, language, and culture all have changed dramatically over time, the link between religion and architecture has always remained.

    • Reply
      Grant Bradman January 15, 2018

      I think it’s really interesting the point that you brought up about how in early architecture planning is thought to have been nonexistent. However, when you dive further into it you realize that is exactly the opposite. Even the most simple things take time and planning.

    • Reply
      Chloe Burkhart January 16, 2018

      I thought the same thing about pre-historic architecture! It still blows my mind that we don’t know how Stonehenge (and other pre-historic structures) was built. There must have been some sort of complex technology used in order to hoist those megaliths on top of each other (unless you believe in aliens 😉 ). Stonehenge is also an example of a structure that was (possibly) built for a higher being.

    • Reply
      JhenniferAmundson January 18, 2018

      I never thought I would enjoy teaching that material until I started learning about anthropologists’ understanding of the evolution of human spirituality, which relates so strongly to architecture. I guess it makes sense that they did not build a lot of permanent architecture, but when they did, they were really, really intentional about it!

  11. Reply
    Jenny Iverson January 15, 2018

    I found early Christian architecture most interesting. I really enjoyed learning about the roots of my faith and found it fascinating that the first churches were within homes. Also, I liked being able to explore biblical architecture, namely Solomon’s temple, and how early Christians were able to incorporate their ideals into actual buildings, like the Mausoleum of Galla Placidia. Overall, I find a lot of value in being able to compare where we were at the beginning of our religion to what it has developed to as I look to what Christian architecture can become in the future.

    • Reply
      JhenniferAmundson January 18, 2018

      I like that era a lot, too. And I think it’s interesting that they didn’t slowly build up from small churches, about the size of their house gatherings, and then up to big ones; as soon as they could, they went BIG! I’m always interested, also, about the way that, even when they could make art and architecture for this newly-legalized/public religion, they maintained the aesthetic values of their culture and tried to match them as closely as possible.

      • Reply
        Brooke Nickell January 18, 2018

        Jenny, I agree I loved the study of the Christian Churches. I found it amazing to be able to trace back the roots of christian worship. I know a little about church history but it makes it so more clear to see the buildings that it produced. So many of the developments in the church can be marked by a change in structures and history shaped the spread of Christianity. I found that I understood more of what happened in the church in the early years because of studying its buildings.

  12. Reply
    Grant Bradman January 15, 2018

    The section of History of Architecture 1 that I found most interesting was the ancient Egyptian civilization. Something that stuck out to me when learning about this civilization was that they built their structures primarily for the dead and the afterlife. Most buildings today are built to be enjoyed by the living, but for them the eternal life that they sought after death was far more important. Also something that stuck out was the use of the paintings within the tombs. Art for us is to be looked at and enjoyed, but for them it was a reminder of the things on earth while they were alive. Once again it was not something for the living to use rather it was for the dead.

    • Reply
      JhenniferAmundson January 18, 2018

      It is interesting that although ancient Egyptian and contemporary (or whenever) Christian culture share the belief in an afterlife, the Egyptians are so literal about their bodily (etc.) needs in it. But it also makes me wonder if they were more intentional, every day of their on-Earth-lives, about preparations for something they expected to be lengthier.

  13. Reply
    Monica Medina January 15, 2018

    The era that was most interesting to me was the time of Gothic Architecture. I loved how elegant all these structures were and how every piece, whether that being from the stained glass to the structural format, was there for a reason and function. I enjoyed learning about the new technology like the flying buttresses, the ribbed groin vaults and the lancet arches. Another reason why I really enjoyed learning about this era is because different parts of Europe, like England and France, took this same style of architecture and made it there own. I thought it was neat to see the subtle, but noticeable differences within these different places.

    • Reply
      David Filipowski January 18, 2018

      Monica I’m with you on this 100% I was hooked on Gothic architecture ever since it was first introduced to me in a history class back in sophomore year of high school. Like you wrote, it is very “elegant” I think because of how EXTREMELY ornate the structures are. Incredible detail that is almost opposite of what we see being built in modern day with the very simplistic and minimalistic buildings.

    • Reply
      JhenniferAmundson January 18, 2018

      Gothic provides a lot of inspiration for different purposes in architecture we’ll see this semester, from the shadowy, poetic and expressive side of it, to its daring structure, and religious symbolism. It’s such a rich resource for architects who are all really different but find a lot of value in its lessons for their contemporary work. Maybe you will, too!

  14. Reply
    Jacob Collins January 15, 2018

    The period that I found the most interesting from last semester’s Arc 231 class was the romanesc period. I found this period to be interesting because of how that the architects from this time period were able to take something that had been established, such as the Basilica and change it to be and serve a completely different purpose, while still maintaining the qualities of the Roman Empire. I also found it interesting that during this time everything that was being built was very elaborate and true works of art while still being able to serve there purpose.

    • Reply
      JhenniferAmundson January 18, 2018

      They definitely left an interesting legacy of precedent use/adoption. Great lessons that we can use for the value of precedents in contemporary architecture.

  15. Reply
    John Ashworth January 15, 2018

    I found the Old World Cultures, especially the U.S. and UK, to be really captivating. Most notably would be Stonehenge and the mound formations close to Judson over by Newark (OH) and St. Louis (IL). We seem to have such little interaction with these ancient ciilizations in our daily lives, yet they were part of the history of the land we inhabit today. Most interesting to me, is really discovering the reasons why certain monuments or structures (like the Stonehenge monoliths) were set up. In the end, I believe these civilizations are more mysterious and unknown to us, which is why it facinates me.

    • Reply
      JhenniferAmundson January 18, 2018

      Oftentimes it seems they did leave more questions than answers, yet at the same time, what little we know about them comes from the stuff they built.

  16. Reply
    JT (Jeffrey) Perek January 15, 2018

    The most interesting movement to me was Gothic architecture. I found it compelling how the forms began to trend towards elegance. The play between the very large structures and the ease the buildings tried to portray at supporting themselves was fascinating. This, mixed with the strong focus on light interacting with the interior of the buildings, was what made this style most memorable to me.

    • Reply
      Jarod Pletcher January 18, 2018

      I agree with you JT. I found the Gothic churches compelling for very similar reasons. The proportions of the structure, such as columns and colonettes was fascinating to me. It mesmerized me how the ribs of the vaults would flow seamlessly into the colonettes along the nave walls, and then those colonettes would synthesize into columns which separated the nave and side aisles. It also astounded me anytime color became involved with the architecture, either colored light through stained glass as in St. Denis, or with colored paints as in Sainte-Chapelle. The color would bring a whole new layer to the experience for the worshiper, and would even more fully display the splendor of God.

    • Reply
      JhenniferAmundson January 18, 2018

      It’s a period from which a lot of the people we’ll study in a few weeks take a lot of inspiration from, around 1750-1900. It’s interesting, too, how diverse those inspirations are: from expressive qualities of light and shade to structural clarity and treatment of ornament. Gothic has a lot of lessons for us.

  17. Reply
    Abacuc Rodriguez January 16, 2018

    I found the section on Greek and Roman architecture the most interesting. Learning about both cultures was interesting and seeing the similarities in there architecture was surprising. I did not expect Greek and Roman architecture to be so similar yet different. Also seeing how Roman architecture was heavily inspired by Etruscan architecture and Greek architecture was heavily inspired by the Minoans and Mycenaean architecture. With the Europe trip next year, this section was fascinating to learn about and only made me more excited to visit the buildings we learned about in class in real life.

    • Reply
      JhenniferAmundson January 18, 2018

      Their relationship to each other is a small version of what we see between 231 & 232: emulation & accommodation.

  18. Reply
    Adam Wise January 16, 2018

    Out of all the eras explored, pre-historic architecture fascinated me the most. For one thing, I thought it interesting to experience the origins of the concept of architecture. In addition, my suppositions had lead me previously to believe that such architecture lacked sophistication. I’m happy to say that our in-class explorations changed my position. Were the structures primitive? That’s a given. But the recognized order and planning in such structures evidence a greater intelligence in the people behind them than I had previously conceived.

    • Reply
      JhenniferAmundson January 18, 2018

      Well then, mission accomplished! Much of that material is new to me since I started teaching this class here at Judson. I am fascinated by the idea of the first architecture, and uncovering the motivations for people to work so hard to make these mysterious piles and circles that clearly have more stories to tell, if we could only crack the code.

  19. Reply
    Andrew Rogers January 16, 2018

    The period that I found the most memorable is the pre-historic era. In class this was very early in the year, but it has really stuck with me because of how they constructed their structures. Some of the structures are so massive that it baffles me. How did they construct it without modern machines? Due to this being so impressive, I find it the most memorable

    • Reply
      Jordan Taylor January 18, 2018

      I totally get what you’re saying. I was blown away by just how massive Stonehenge is, as well as how far away the stones themselves came from. It’s hard to imagine just how much harder it was to drag those stones as far as they did without the machinery we have today.

    • Reply
      JhenniferAmundson January 18, 2018

      I’m really intrigued by how many of you are citing prehistory as your thing. I didn’t expect that! But I agree, they are astonishing things to look at and try and puzzle out how and why they came to be.

  20. Reply
    Chloe Burkhart January 16, 2018

    The most interesting part of ARC231 for me was the study of Chinese and Japanese architecture. Since these two cultures are unfortunately often lumped together in ignorant people’s minds, I was excited to learn of their differences. For example, structures like pagodas, that appear in both Chinese and Japanese architecture, have differences between the two cultures. I find that so important and interesting. As a culture adopts something from another region, they tweak and change it in order for it to suit their way of living best, thus creating something inspired, yet totally different.

    • Reply
      Jacob Collins January 17, 2018

      I agree the Asian architecture was interesting, mostly because most people do not experience this type of architecture

    • Reply
      Jenny Iverson January 17, 2018

      I agree, it was very cool to learn the differences between Chinese and Japanese architecture. I really like seeing how different cultures can take a similar design and make it their own. I also enjoyed how both groups were able to take elements of their culture and use it to shape their designs, like with the Tea House at the Katsura Imperial Villa and how it worked to humble those who entered it.

    • Reply
      Anna Wightman January 18, 2018

      I think your point about cultures picking up and adapting aspects of those around them is very interesting. Not only did pagodas adapt from each other, but they adapted from the Stupa. And considering the functional differences of both, this is an even more interesting fact. It’s hard to believe that Indian mounds used for Buddhist monk burials turned into beauties themselves, and eventually turned into elaborate pagodas in both China and Japan!

    • Reply
      JhenniferAmundson January 18, 2018

      I find the cultural interplay really interesting, too. I think part of the fascination is that we in the “West” tend to know less about these cultures than we do about Europe, for example, and make assumptions about them–many people are really surprised at how far people traveled on a regular basis for trade, so it makes sense that they’d share cultural and architectural ideas, but it’s still somehow a surprise to see them standing there in three dimensions, with certain commonalities in place, but then also significant differences, as well.

  21. Reply
    Jordan Taylor January 16, 2018

    Sumerian architecture is definitely one of the most memorable for me now. Specifically, it interests me because I find it fascinating just how similar certain Greek and Roman buildings were to the Mesopotamic period. For example, the ziggurats were used to elevate the temples similarly to the Greek and Roman acropolis, simultaneously putting them at place of visual prominence, safety from dangers (floodwaters and attackers), and mimicking the mountains both homes of the gods. Their residential architecture was similar too: a courtyard focused structure with a mostly blank exterior wall to give the interior privacy and protection from the outside.

    • Reply
      JhenniferAmundson January 18, 2018

      And much of that was accomplished without enough cultural interaction to explain the connection–much of it comes from the simple and basic stuff that people have in common.

    • Reply
      Diana Romero January 22, 2018

      I agree with your interest in the Sumerian architecture. I’m amazed for the technology and the building techniques even though Mesopotamian constructions were nearly the first attempts to create non-ephemeral architecture. They would establish their power and how thankful they were to their gods by building really tall ziggurats (the taller the closest to the gods). The ziggurats remind me of the pyramids constructed later on around the world, they both have religious purposes and similar structures.

  22. Reply
    Brooke Nickell January 16, 2018

    The anionic ornament as well as the beautiful honeycomb vaults of Islamic Architecture were wonderful. I enjoyed learning about the development of Islamic architecture in conjunction with the development of Christian churches and cathedrals. They both developed from a residential president and grew to accommodate liturgical needs. The anionic ornament of the Mosques are beautiful calligraphy art pieces that are fascinating typographic studies. I only lament not being able to read any of it.

    • Reply
      JhenniferAmundson January 18, 2018

      With a few semesters of Arabic, you could change that! 😉
      I really love that material, too. It’s so visually compelling and complex in its expression of the nature of the divine: on the one hand, blindingly simple; on the other hand, dizzyingly unknowable.

  23. Reply
    Aaron Foster January 16, 2018

    The Pre-Historic period of architecture is quite unique. In forms such as henges and earthworks that spread over vast amounts of land, the idea that people of that culture could achieve these without any prior knowledge of architecture proves that they were certainly not uncivilized and unintelligent. The response to creating structure for the purpose of worship and burial seem to be a human instinct. It is important to see that architecture is not solely for beauty but is created for a purpose to fulfill a need in society.

    • Reply
      JhenniferAmundson January 18, 2018

      Well I suppose it begs the question what WAS their “prior knowledge”? There are countless buildings that were lost to time, and only a few permanent ones remain to suggest what they might have been like.

  24. Reply
    Aaron Foster January 16, 2018

    I appreciate the way in which this style of design was of great importance and intention. The placement of each part of the composition was thoughtfully placed and used parts of nature to form composition. It was interesting in how pathways and flow was created in a way to humble to the nature and architecture, such as the doorways one had to crawl through to enter.

  25. Reply
    Jarod Pletcher January 16, 2018

    The Gothic churches were of great interest to me in Arc231. I find it fascinating that at a time when most were illiterate, including those building the churches, the people of medieval Europe were able to design and construct such magnificent structures. The Gothic churches were built based on Roman precedence, but very designed full of Christian symbolism of their time. Rich with ornamentation, the churches told a story to the worshiper of redemption and salvation, and they gave a physical representation to the otherwise incomprehensible beauty of God.

    • Reply
      JhenniferAmundson January 18, 2018

      As impressive as they are now, they must have been unbelievably magical when they were new.

  26. Reply
    Diana Romero January 16, 2018

    Greek culture was the most fascinating to me. How they created specific orders that belonged to different periods of time and how they developed their architecture from previous cultures as the Mycenaeans and Minoans. The greeks were very social oriented, they created spaces for entertainment, political, social gatherings as theaters, colosseums, agoras and more. What I found very impressive was that they used optical illusions in buildings as the alexemata in the Parthenon. Also, what I found very interesting was the beauty and details in the sculptures in the Hellenistic period. They precision and proportions were too perfect.

    • Reply
      JhenniferAmundson January 18, 2018

      You’ve packed a lot in there! I agree, the optical illusions are amazing; who thinks of that? I also appreciate your comment about their diversified society; it’s always instructive to see what a civilization builds that shows what is really important to it.

  27. Reply
    Ian Burns January 16, 2018

    Greek architecture was always–and probably will forever be–the most interesting section of architecture to study. As for why, I’ve generally always had a fascination for the Greek culture and technological ability to construct massive temples and monuments, which are also nearly mathematically perfect in all its forms. When I had the chance to visit the Acropolis in person, I was mentally overloaded by the precision of the laid stonework and detail, and by the fact that these monumental creations–which could be seen for miles–were able to impact the surrounding culture and society for millennia.

    • Reply
      JhenniferAmundson January 18, 2018

      It is an extraordinary accomplishment, and especially in Athens, where you know they intended that stuff to last this long–and beyond!

Leave a Reply to JhenniferAmundson Cancel reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

css.php