Syllabus

weekly workflow

The workweek for the blended ARC232 runs from Tuesday through Monday:

  • Tuesdays: begin assignments listed on the calendar below
  • Thursday nights: due dates for online comprehension quizzes
  • Saturday nights: due dates for discussion board and Instagram postings (follow-up by the following Thursday to comment on peer posts)
  • Monday nights: two-hour F2F class

Scroll down for greater detail.

Note: Having tech problems? For JU service issues, contact the IT Helpdesk; for specific applications, troubleshoot Instagram or VoiceThread directly; for missing/broken links on this website, email Dr. Amundson).

January 10-15: Inventing the Renaissance

What cultural, intellectual, or other factors brought about the advent of the Renaissance in 15th-century Italy? Who are the main protagonists in this story and what monuments are emblematic of their contribution to the development of architectural history?

Tuesday-Saturday:

Monday:

  • introduction to the course
  • lecture/discussion (Brunelleschi; the Medici)

January 16-22: Early Renaissance

What are the main cultural values and architectural principles expressed in Renaissance theory? Who made the greatest contributions to its 100-year development, and how is it manifest in built work by the leading architects?

Tuesday-Saturday:

Monday:

  • lecture/discussion (Bramante, theory, introduction to St. Peter's)
  • guide to St. Peter's

January 23-29: High Renaissance

How do the developments of the High Renaissance build upon and depart from established traditions of the Early Renaissance? What are Michelangelo's and Palladio's contributions to art, architecture, and urban design? What special opportunities do villas present to their designers?

on your own

optional, but recommended

with the group

  • test 1: Renaissance
  • lecture/discussion (Michelangelo, villas, Palladio)

January 30-February 5: Baroque Italy

What historic events precipitate the advent of the Baroque period in Italy? Who are its main patrons and practitioners? How does their work relate to the architecture of the High Renaissance, both in commonalities and distinctions?

on your own

optional, but recommended

with the group

  • lecture/discussion (the Reformation & Counter-Reformation; Baroque in Italy; Bernini & Borromini)

February 6-12: Baroque France & England

In what ways is Baroque architecture in France and England different from the original, Italian version? Under what conditions were its main monuments (Versailles and St. Paul's) constructed, and how did they establish such enduring legacies?

on your own

with the group

  • lecture/discussion (Baroque in France & England)
  • note: previously-scheduled test has been moved; semester scheduling of tests has been revised (2/5/18).

additional resources:

February 13-19: Muslim Empires

What are the main developments in mosque design starting in the fifteenth century? What are the commonalities of design in the Mughal, Ottoman, and Safavid empires, and in what ways are they each distinct?

on your own

not required, but recommended:

with the group

  • test 2: High Renaissance & Baroque

February 20-26: New Classicisms

What social, political, technical and artistic interests change or develop in the eighteenth century? What gives rise to the three variations in Classicism seen in this period, and what distinguishes them (Baroque, Neo-Palladian, and Neo-Classicism) from each other? Why does Classicism remain so popular even as its particular manifestations in architectural design change? Why are books important to this period?

on your own

resources for assignment

additional (not required) resources

with the group

  • catching up from last week: lecture/discussion (Ottoman, Safavid, Mughal)
  • lecture/discussion (English Baroque, Anglo-Palladianism, Neo-Classicism)
  • note for next week: class does not meet on March 5 (Spring Break)

February 27-March 12: Late Eighteenth-Early Nineteenth theory, style, and industry

What was the Industrial Revolution and how did it impact society? What are its main productions and to what extent to they immediately affect architecture? What explains the great diversity of theoretical and stylistic possibilities of this period? 

on your own

with the group

  • lecture/discussion (late 18th & early 19th-century industry, style, & theory)

extra resources (theory)

March 13-19: Arts and Crafts Movement, the École des Beaux-Arts

Who were the main protagonists behind the Arts and Crafts Movement? What social and artistic conditions did they feel the need to address, and how did their work in various design disciplines accomplish their goals (what were their principles and how were they manifest in design at all scales)?
What were the founding design principles of the École des Beaux-Arts? How were they manifest in the design of individual buildings as well as urban schemes? How and why was the École used as a model for practice and education in the USA?
What is the relationship of each of these movements to the broader developments of industrialization in the later nineteenth century, and to each other?

on your own

with the group

  • test 3
  • lecture/discussion (British Arts & Crafts movement; the École des Beaux-Arts)

additional resources

March 20-26: Tall Buildings and the Belle Époque

What are the main issues of technological and aesthetic design that were faced by architects of the first skyscrapers? What various ways did they solve them?
What are the main ideas that connect the variations of Art Nouveau movements around the world, and how are they distinct in either individual or regional/national practices?

on your own

take a deeper look (optional)

with the group

  • lecture/discussion
  • note: the previously-scheduled field trip, planned for Saturday, March 24, has been cancelled (actually, postponed, to next year, and will be managed as part of ARC331)

March 27-April 02: Early Modernism/The Machine Age

Who were the architects central to Modernist movements in the first two decades of the 20th century? What goals did they share, and how did they differ in achieving them (especially considering aesthetics and building technology)? What new structural materials are embraced by architects for new conceptions of space and planning?

on your own

Go deeper (optional)

note: class does not meet on Monday, April 2 (Easter Monday)

April 3-9: Early Modernism/Neues Bauen

How did the many threads of architectural development in the first two decades of the twentieth century resolve into the designs that contemporaries called neues bauen? Within the general concerns of Modernism, how did individual architects (like Rietveld, Gropius, Le Corbusier, and Mies) achieve their goals? What is the role of women in the profession, practice, and promotion of architecture in the early twentieth century?

on your own

go deeper (optional)

with the group

  • OPTIONAL: review session for test 4 on Wednesday, April 4 at 5 PM (location TBA)
  • test 4: Arts & Crafts/Ecole and Tall Buildings/Belle Epoque
  • lecture/discussion: Early Modernism (Machine Age/Neues Bauen)
  • note: class on Monday night will be led by a special guest!

April 10-16: Mid-Century Modernism

Considering the three most prominent Modernist architects (Le Corbusier, Mies van der Rohe, and Wright), what does their mature, mid-century work have in common? How is each distinct? How does the mid-century work of each develop on, or depart from, their earlier work?
What are the main building types featured in the developments of the twentieth century, and what do they express about historic developments of the time? What different attitudes about cities are offered by these architects?

on your own

go deeper (optional)

with the group

  • test: Early Modernism (Machine Age/Neues Bauen)
  • lecture/discussion: Mid-Twentieth Century

April 17-23: Late Twentieth Century

What are the main developments in architecture in the last decades of the twentieth century? What do they have in common, and how do they diverge? What does this plurality of approach suggest about the profession?

on your own

to go deeper (optional)

with the group

  • introduction to essay/unessay project
  • lecture/discussion: later 20th c.

April 24-30: Last Class Meeting (PRELIMINARY)

The big themes...

with the group

  • test: mid- to later-20th century
  • survey: end-of-semester evaluation of blended learning; provide three pieces of advice for students starting the class next year

weekly workflow

The workweek for ARC232 begins on Tuesday and concludes on Monday nights with our two-hour F2F class. Anticipate due dates for online work at 11:59 PM on Thursdays (for comprehension quizzes) and Saturdays (for discussion board and Instagram posts). As with any 3-credit class, you should plan to spend 8-9 hours (on average) on this course: 2 in F2F meetings and 6-7 completing online work and other independent study. For each module (week of work) listed below, expect the following general activities:

  • Read the textbook (preview chapter sections, make note of subject headings and illustrations that will begin to form a mental outline; return for careful reading and note-taking).
  • Engage online work: watch videos, VoiceThreads, visit websites (etc.) as directed in each module. Give them your full attention; avoid multi-tasking.
  • Complete online comprehension quizzes on the textbook and web-based materials (due Thursdays). These are ungraded, formative assignments. Print or take notes on your results for future reference.
  • Post on the discussion board and Instagram (due Saturdays) after the appropriate prompts have been provided. Treat these with the care and formality that you would dedicate to a traditional paper turned in for a grade. These are graded assignments of application.
  • Note: Take care when posting words and images that are not your own. For text, provide credit lines according to the CMS. To make sure your use of images is legal, when you search, use filtering criteria (in Google Images, navigate through Tools > Usage Rights > Labeled for noncommercial reuse with modification).
  • Leave comments on colleagues' work (due the following Thursday). Give the kind of critique that you would like to receive: fair, in-depth, encouraging, and constructive. Return (by the following Saturday) to review comments made by colleagues & Dr. Amundson.
  • Consistently review and study to reinforce your learning; prepare for (roughly) biweekly tests in F2F meetings.
  • Note: Having tech problems? For JU service issues, contact the IT Helpdesk; for specific applications, troubleshoot Instagram or VoiceThread directly; for missing/broken links on this website, email Dr. Amundson).
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